Search

Parenting is the Most Important Job (in the World)


Parents are expected to keep up with the various daily demands of parenting. Juggling all these tasks can be incredibly difficult - especially when schools refuse to acknowledge the social or emotional inadequacies of classroom curriculum, and in the ways they ultimately affect academic performance.


You’re Only Human, BUT, you are also a Constant Role Model


From the time our children are conceived, they begin absorbing information about the world around, them almost as quickly as their clothes pick up grass stains. It’s crucial for parents to realize that every second we have interacting with our children counts!


We must be mindful of our voice tone and choice of words when disciplining our children. Modeling frustration tolerance and being able to self-regulate as parents affects our children's social and emotional development more than most parents realize.


Nothing is Perfect


We're not the only ones with pressure, our children feel it too. We've all been there ourselves or witnessed a classmate crumple up a drawing or paragraph he/she thinks they made a

mistake on after working so hard to make it "perfect."


These moments, no matter how often, chip away at our child's self esteem. Sometimes these experiences escalate into bigger problems and other times kids can just shake it off, fix their

mistake, and move on. But why not add an extra cushion and lighten their load in life? Parents and teachers, I encourage you to make purposeful mistakes and show our children it's okay to take risks, acknowledge children's accomplishments, no matter how big or small, LAUGH, learn and move on!


Next time you or your child overreacts over something that isn't such a big deal, say this out loud: "Oh, I made a mistake. That's how I learn and I will try not to make the same mistake again. No biggie"- smile and move on.

Check Yourself Before You Wreck Yourself (and your kid)

Ask yourself these questions:

  • When was the last time I became annoyed or angry with my child?

  • How did I respond?

  • What choice of words did I use?

  • How was my voice tone?

  • Was it warranted?

If in hindsight your child really didn’t do anything wrong and you flew off the handle or think you did some emotional damage, ask yourself these questions:

  • How often do I do that?

  • Am I being effective when I react that way?

  • What is my child learning from these interactions?

  • Am I getting the outcome I want?

Here are some parenting tips to ensure you handle the situation in a positive way that fosters your child's growth in the future:

  • Listen to your children's comments - you can learn a lot from them!

  • Use your mistakes as examples to encourage children to make mistakes (show them it is okay!)

  • Encourage good behavior by giving specific feedback

  • Know when to take a break if you are getting over emotional

  • Celebrate every successful moment in parenting

  • Take joy in your child's accomplishments no matter how big or small



Want to build a better connection with your child? Be the best parent you can be? Schedule a personalized one-on-one Parent Strategy Session with Jamie today!


BOOK MY PARENT STRATEGY SESSION!